Integrated Transformative Practice (ITP) engages nearly every aspect of your life. It is designed to integrate body, mind, and spirit in yourself, your family, your program, your community, culture and nature. The ITP worksheet at the Haag Home is located on the back of your weekly planner.

 

How does ITP work?

 

It is a modular approach to practice. An ITP module is a category of practice that relates to a specific part of your being, such as body, mind and spirit. Identifying your practice modules will give you an overview of your practice life, allowing you to determine which areas you’re exercising and which you’re leaving out.

 

Second, ITP is scalable, which means you can simplify and shorten your practice to accommodate your time frame. Do you often find yourself too busy too practice? You can do a basic form of ITP in as little as ten minutes a day.

 

Do you have a wide or very specific range of practice interests? ITP is customizable, letting you bring your unique interests, passions, and needs into play.

 

ITP Core Modules

q  Body

q  Mind

q  Social

q  Spirit

 

Additional important modules include:

q  Work

q  Relationships

q  Family

q  Parenting

q  Communication

q  Culture

q  Emotions

q  Creativity

 

Designing you ITP

 

Your ITP must be personalized, because no one else has your life! The flexibility of ITP allows you to sculpt your practice into a customized form that’s optimal for you. We begin by guiding you through the design of an effective cross-training program that can become a sustainable lifestyle. The idea is to choose practices that you love doing and commit to a practice vision and way of living that you love being. But that’s not the end of it-just as life never stands still, your ITP can and should change over time-adapting and evolving with you. The ITP design process can bring your practice vision to life.

 

  1. Assess your current practices.
  2. Identify what’s missing
  3. Choose your practices
  4. Practice
  5. Be flexible
  6. Fine tune continuously
  7. Get support

 

1. Assess your Current Situation

 

You may already be doing an ITP, or at least major parts of it! In this first step of your ITP design, scan your life to determine what practices you already have.

What are you already doing that could be considered a practice, an intentional activity that you repeat consciously and regularly for the purpose of health or growth?

 

2. Identify what’s missing

 

The next step is to locate any imbalances or gaps in your current practice. Gaps are important areas or modules you tend to neglect. Consider where you might need to take on new practices in order to have a truly Integrated Transformative Practice.

Maybe you have no problem exercising, but smoke too much. More specifically, maybe you need to increase aerobic workouts (like jogging) and find a different reward (other than smoking) after a workout. Perhaps, the spirit module is incomplete because you don’t believe in God. Are there are other ways to define spirit? Do you believe in a higher power?

 

The most effective design for your practice is neither too tight nor too loose. You should be able to readily engage and enjoy your practices, but they should also challenge you. They should refresh and orient your energy and attention, while also integrating seamlessly and pleasurably into your life.

What’s your pattern? This simple exercise can have revolutionary power to set a clear, integrating, and growth-promoting direction for your whole life.

 

3. Choose your practices

 

Now you’re ready to fill in the gaps by determining new practices to which you’re willing to commit. You may also choose to delete or modify any of your current practices that have become stale and ineffective and no longer serve their original purpose.

It may take some trial and error to find the right practice mix for you. When you’re choosing your practices, remember: more is not necessarily better. The point is not to add practices upon practices until you get sick of practicing.

In addition to the name and a brief description of your practices, be sure to write down how often you are committing to doing the practice. The frequency will vary with the practice. So on your ITP design blueprint, indicate the practices you commit to do every day, in addition to those you will do less often, whether that’s every other day, five times a week, or just once or twice weekly.

 

4. Practice

 

When it comes down to it, ITP is about actually practicing. This involves discipline, persistence, patience, and often quite a bit of fun. The secret of ITP is actually doing the practices you set for yourself.

It isn’t easy to begin something new and really stick with it. Commitment and self-discipline are generally required. It typically takes about ninety days to establish a new healthy habit. But once you’ve carved a new groove in your pattern of living, it’s much easier to keep with it consistently. So it’s especially important to stay in alignment with what you committed to do, and what you’re actually doing, for the first three months.

To accomplish this, many people find it helpful to track their practices. Tracking is a way to keep yourself on track. It can help you stay with your initial practice commitments and can also re-energize practice after years or decades.

 

5. Be Flexible

 

Once you’re in a groove of regularly practicing, you can be creative about your practice design. Ultimately, your ITP, like your whole life, can be a living work of art. As in any art, the form is critical. Don’t use creativity as an excuse for sloppiness, which undermines the intensity and free awareness of the practice life. But don’t become a prisoner of rigid forms either. Create opportunities to improvise, play, and be inspired by what moves you in the moment.

 

6. Fine-tune continuously

 

Periodically, throughout a life of practice, it’s necessary to refresh your practices-to redesign your ITP. Practice evolves! Updating your practice keeps it dynamic and alive. It’s healthy and appropriate for your practice to shift as you pass into new stages and phases of your life. In fact, to reflect deeply and consciously on the form of your practice is itself a practice.

Setting a timeline for your commitments can help you do this. You may want to literally write out, “I will do my new strength training workout 3x/week until September 1, at which time I will make a new exercise commitment that sustains muscle strength.” (Remember that practice commitments that last at least three months are usually most productive.)

 

7. Get support

 

Your practice commitments become more meaningful when they can’t just slip away unnoticed. When you let someone else know whether or not you do your practices, a basic accountability occurs. Group interaction helps avoid pitfalls such as breaking commitments, getting caught in an inflated sense of progress and robotically going through the motions. Many people find that their practice benefits from the visibility and accountability a group can provide.

 

Core Values, Vision, and Life Purpose

 

The ground level foundation of practice is your daily discipline. The high level of foundation of practice is the why of practice-its meaning. This includes your purpose in practicing, how your practice expresses your values, and how practice helps you actualize your purpose and realize your personal vision. It can be powerful to clarify this high level foundation by articulating your values, vision, and purpose.

 

Your values are what enduringly matter most to you. They determine what you pay attention to and act on. Here are a few examples of values: humility, wellness, advancement, freedom, family, integrity, spirituality, fairness, winning, sensitivity, duty, relationships, adventure, service, fitness, empathy, morality, security and openness.

One way to clarify and prioritize core values is to articulate them as guiding principles for living. One form they can take is an I statement:

 

 

Your vision is a compelling picture of a desired future. It is what you want to create; a target to orient toward that reflects how you might like yourself and your circumstance to manifest in the time ahead. While it is ambitious and aim high with your vision, make it realistic too. Your vision is a way to link up with your desired future, bringing intention and awareness to your possibilities.

A compelling vision paints a clear picture of a future that is better than the present. It evokes an emotional response. It clarifies direction and focuses your attention. It motivates you and inspires you.

When articulating your vision, it is sometimes helpful to speak in the present tense from a targeted date in the future. For example: “It is now January 24th (of the next year) and I am (where? Doing what?). Visions of varying lengths-six-month, one-year, two-year, and five-year-can be appropriate. You may want to articulate specific vision statements for your personal and professional life and perhaps also for your practice.

Here is an example of a vision statement:

 

It is September 1 of (next year), and I feel embraced by supportive and loving relationships with my family and friends. I am sober and working a job I love. I go to AA meetings twice a week and church once a week to connect with my higher power.

 

Your purpose is your reason for existence. What is your unique contribution? You can clarify your purpose by asking yourself why again and again. “Why is it important that you exist?” “What is the gift that you bring?” “What are you moved to be and do?” As you keep asking, the answers may become both more abstract and more essential: what is your central reason for being and doing what you do? Here’s one example of a life purpose statement:

“ In the service of helping the community, I will help other youth like me that got into trouble.”

 

If you decide to write out a statement of purpose, accept that it is a deep process. Your first version will probably sound awkward. Revise, and come back later to make further revisions. When it resonates as true and feels right, it can function to orient your life, vision, and practice.

 

 

 

  1. What does ITP stand for?

 

  1. At the Haag Home, where is our ITP worksheet?

 

  1. What are the four core ITP modules?

 

  1. What are the seven steps of the design process of the ITP?

 

  1. “What are you already doing that could be considered a practice, an intentional activity that you repeat consciously and regularly for the purpose of health or growth?”

 

  1. What are some current gaps (areas you tend to neglect) you have in your ITP?

 

  1. “Updating your practice keeps it dynamic and alive. It’s healthy and appropriate for your practice to shift as you pass into new stages and phases of your life.”

 

  1. List three values you have using “I” statements. For example, I value freedom because when I am incarcerated I am unable to be with my family.

 

  1. When articulating your vision, it is sometimes helpful to speak in the present tense from a targeted date in the future. For example: “It is now January 24th (of the next year) and I am (where? Doing what?). Visions of varying lengths-six-month, one-year, two-year, and five-year-can be appropriate. You may want to articulate specific vision statements for your personal and professional life and perhaps also for your practice.

 

Here is an example of a vision statement:

 

It is September 1 of (next year), and I feel embraced by supportive and loving relationships with my family and friends. I am sober and working a job I love. I go to AA meetings twice a week and church once a week to connect with my higher power.

 

Share 3 visions you have for yourself using the format listed above.